Ebook Haul #2: 13 Recent eBooks I Added To My To-Be-Read list

So I’m coming with you with another book haul. 🙂 Quite different this time as these are ebooks. I actually already made one like these previously. SO yeah, this ebook haul. Not new. I’m adding new books to my infinite TBR pile. Not new. I’m hoarding new books. Not new. Hoarding books? That’s what I do best. Is there a job where its employees are only required to just purchase books to read because I’ll definitely apply for that.

The below books vary in genre and if you know my reading history, I don’t stick to just one genre. There’s nonfiction, literary fiction, middle grade, mystery and young adult. I added the synopsis of each book for everyone’s reference.

1. One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter: Essays
by Scaachi Koul

Synopsis: A collection of essays about growing up the daughter of Indian immigrants in Canada, “a land of ice and casual racism,” by the cultural observer, Scaachi Koul.

In One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, Scaachi deploys her razor-sharp humour to share her fears, outrages and mortifying experiences as an outsider growing up in Canada. Her subjects range from shaving her knuckles in grade school, to a shopping trip gone horribly awry, to dealing with internet trolls, to feeling out of place at an Indian wedding (as an Indian woman), to parsing the trajectory of fears and anxieties that pressed upon her immigrant parents and bled down a generation. Alongside these personal stories are pointed observations about life as a woman of colour, where every aspect of her appearance is open for critique, derision or outright scorn. Where strict gender rules bind in both Western and Indian cultures, forcing her to confront questions about gender dynamics, racial tensions, ethnic stereotypes and her father’s creeping mortality–all as she tries to find her feet in the world.

I GOT THIS BOOK BECAUSE OF THE WAY THE TITLE WAS WRITTEN. AND ALSO THIS WILL BE MY FIRST ESSAY COLLECTION THAT I’LL READ AND REVIEW. EXCITED FOR THIS ONE!

2. The Woman Who Had Two Navels and Tales of the Tropical Gothic
by Nick Joaquín

Synopsis: Nick Joaquin is widely considered one of the greatest Filipino writers, but he has remained little-known outside his home country despite writing in English. With the post-colonial sensibilities of Junot Diaz, Teju Cole, and Jhumpa Lahiri and an ironic perspective of colonial history resonant with Marques and Llosa, Joaquin is a long-neglected writer ready to join the ranks of the world classics. His work meditates on the questions and challenges of the Filipino individual’s new freedom after a long history of colonialism, exploring folklore, centuries-old Catholic rites, the Spanish colonial past, magical realism, and baroque splendour and excess. This collection features his best-known story, ‘The Woman Who Had Two Navels,’ centred on Philippine emigrants living in Hong Kong and later expanded into a novel, the much-anthologised story ‘May Day Eve,’ and a canonical play, A Portrait of the Artist as Filipino.

WHEN IT WAS ANNOUNCE THAT THIS BOOK WILL BE PUBLISHED I ALREADY SET AN EYE ON THIS ONE. I HAVEN’T READ AND REVIEW A BOOK WRITTEN BY A LOCAL AUTHOR IN ENGLISH SO THAT DEFINITELY ADDED THRILL TO THIS ONE.

3. The Power
by Naomi Alderman

Synopsis: In The Power the world is a recognisable place: there’s a rich Nigerian kid who larks around the family pool; a foster girl whose religious parents hide their true nature; a local American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But something vital has changed, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power – they can cause agonising pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world changes utterly.

This extraordinary novel by Naomi Alderman, a Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year and Granta Best of British writer, is not only a gripping story of how the world would change if power was in the hands of women but also exposes, with breath-taking daring, our contemporary world.

EXCITING PREMISE. A DYSTOPIAN BOOK MARKETED AS AN ADULT BOOK. THIS WILL BE NEW FOR ME.

4. Stay with Me
by Ayobami Adebayo

Synopsis: ‘There are things even love can’t do… If the burden is too much and stays too long, even love bends, cracks, comes close to breaking and sometimes does break. But even when it’s in a thousand pieces around your feet, that doesn’t mean it’s no longer love…’

Yejide is hoping for a miracle, for a child. It is all her husband wants, all her mother-in-law wants, and she has tried everything – arduous pilgrimages, medical consultations, dances with prophets, appeals to God. But when her in-laws insist upon a new wife, it is too much for Yejide to bear. It will lead to jealousy, betrayal and despair.

Unravelling against the social and political turbulence of 80s Nigeria, Stay With Me sings with the voices, colours, joys and fears of its surroundings. Ayobami Adebayo weaves a devastating story of the fragility of married love, the undoing of family, the wretchedness of grief, and the all-consuming bonds of motherhood. It is a tale about our desperate attempts to save ourselves and those we love from heartbreak.

THE SYNOPSIS HOOKED ME UP. THIS WILL BE A GOOD ADDITION TO BOOKS BY AFRICAN AUTHORS THAT I’M ADDING TO MY TBR.

5. American Street
by Ibi Zoboi

Synopsis: The rock in the water does not know the pain of the rock in the sun.

On the corner of American Street and Joy Road, Fabiola Toussaint thought she would finally find une belle vie—a good life.

But after they leave Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Fabiola’s mother is detained by U.S. immigration, leaving Fabiola to navigate her loud American cousins, Chantal, Donna, and Princess; the grittiness of Detroit’s west side; a new school; and a surprising romance, all on her own.

Just as she finds her footing in this strange new world, a dangerous proposition presents itself, and Fabiola soon realizes that freedom comes at a cost. Trapped at the crossroads of an impossible choice, will she pay the price for the American dream?

THE BOOK’S SYNOPSIS REMINDS ME OF THE SUN IS ALSO A STAR. STOKED.

6. Piecing Me Together
by Renée Watson

Synopsis: A timely and powerful story about a teen girl from a poor neighborhood striving for success, from acclaimed author Renée Watson.

Jade believes she must get out of her neighborhood if she’s ever going to succeed. Her mother says she has to take every opportunity. She has. She accepted a scholarship to a mostly-white private school and even Saturday morning test prep opportunities. But some opportunities feel more demeaning than helpful. Like an invitation to join Women to Women, a mentorship program for “at-risk” girls. Except really, it’s for black girls. From “bad” neighborhoods.

But Jade doesn’t need support. And just because her mentor is black doesn’t mean she understands Jade. And maybe there are some things Jade could show these successful women about the real world and finding ways to make a real difference.

TIMELY. TIMELY. TIMELY.

Friendships, race, privilege, identity—this compelling and thoughtful story explores the issues young women face.

7. Penance
by Kanae Minato

Synopsis: The tense, chilling story of four women haunted by a childhood trauma.

When they were children, Sae, Maki, Akiko and Yuko were tricked into separating from their friend Emily by a mysterious stranger. Then the unthinkable occurs: Emily is found murdered hours later.

Sae, Maki, Akiko and Yuko weren’t able to accurately describe the stranger’s appearance to the police after the Emili’s body was discovered. Asako, Emily’s mother, curses the surviving girls, vowing that they will pay for her daughter’s murder.

Like Confessions, Kanae Minato’s award-winning, internationally bestselling debut, PENANCE is a dark and voice-driven tale of revenge and psychological trauma that will leave readers breathless.

IF YOU’VE READ MY BOOK REVIEW OF CONFESSIONS BY KANAE MINATO, YOU’LL PROBABLY WON’T ASK WHY I GOT THIS BOOK. I ENJOYED THAT BOOK TO PIECES.

8. Dear Ijeawele, Or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions
by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Synopsis: From the best-selling author of Americanah and We Should All Be Feminists comes a powerful new statement about feminism today–written as a letter to a friend.

A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

ANOTHER BOOK BY AN AUTHOR WHO’S FIRST WORK I REALLY ENJOYED. HER TINY BOOK WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS INTRODUCED FEMINISM TO ME IN WAYS BETTER THAN ALL OTHER NONFICTION BOOKS THAT I’VE READ AT SCHOOL. I’M QUITE EXCITED TO START THIS NEW BOOK BY HER.

9. The Accusation: Forbidden Stories from Inside North Korea
by Bandi

Synopsis: The Accusation is a deeply moving and eye-opening work of fiction that paints a powerful portrait of life under the North Korean regime. Set during the period of Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il’s leadership, the seven stories that make up The Accusation give voice to people living under this most bizarre and horrifying of dictatorships. The characters of these compelling stories come from a wide variety of backgrounds, from a young mother living among the elite in Pyongyang whose son misbehaves during a political rally, to a former Communist war hero who is deeply disillusioned with the intrusion of the Party into everything he holds dear, to a husband and father who is denied a travel permit and sneaks onto a train in order to visit his critically ill mother. Written with deep emotion and writing talent, The Accusation is a vivid depiction of life in a closed-off one-party state, and also a hopeful testament to the humanity and rich internal life that persists even in such inhumane conditions.

THIS BOOK IS GETTING QUIET A HYPE. CHECKED WHO THE AUTHOR IS. CHECKED GOODREADS. “Bandi, which means “firefly” in Korean, is a pseudonym for a writer who is still living in his homeland of North Korea. The Accusation, which was written in secret and smuggled out of the country, is his only published book to date.” PURCHASED!

10. What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky
by Lesley Nneka Arimah

Synopsis: A dazzlingly accomplished debut collection explores the ties that bind parents and children, husbands and wives, lovers and friends to one another and to the places they call home.

In “Who Will Greet You at Home”, a National Magazine Award finalist for The New Yorker, a woman desperate for a child weaves one out of hair, with unsettling results. In “Wild”, a disastrous night out shifts a teenager and her Nigerian cousin onto uneasy common ground. In “The Future Looks Good,” three generations of women are haunted by the ghosts of war, while in “Light,” a father struggles to protect and empower the daughter he loves. And in the title story, in a world ravaged by flood and riven by class, experts have discovered how to “fix the equation of a person” – with rippling, unforeseen repercussions.

Evocative, playful, subversive, and incredibly human, What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky heralds the arrival of a prodigious talent with a remarkable career ahead of her.

IT’S BEEN LIKE AGES SINCE I LAST READ A SHORT STORY COLLECTION. THE PREMISE OF THIS BOOK LOOKS INTERESTING. MAGICAL REALISM? SOLD!

11. Into the Water
by Paula Hawkins

Synopsis: A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother’s sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from—a place to which she vowed she’d never return.

Beware a calm surface—you never know what lies beneath.

I DID NOT KNOW THAT PAUL HAWKINS HAS A NEW BOOK NOT UNTIL THE RELEASED DATE! HOPING THAT THIS WILL BE GOOD LIKE THE GIRL IN THE TRAIN.

12. Amina’s Voice
by Hena Khan

Synopsis: A Pakistani-American Muslim girl struggles to stay true to her family’s vibrant culture while simultaneously blending in at school after tragedy strikes her community in this sweet and moving middle grade novel from the award-winning author of It’s Ramadan, Curious George and Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns.

Amina has never been comfortable in the spotlight. She is happy just hanging out with her best friend, Soojin. Except now that she’s in middle school everything feels different. Soojin is suddenly hanging out with Emily, one of the “cool” girls in the class, and even talking about changing her name to something more “American.” Does Amina need to start changing too? Or hiding who she is to fit in? While Amina grapples with these questions, she is devastated when her local mosque is vandalized.

Amina’s Voice brings to life the joys and challenges of a young Pakistani American and highlights the many ways in which one girl’s voice can help bring a diverse community together to love and support each other.

LOVELY COVER. DIVERSITY. I CAN’T ALSO REMEMBER THE LAST TIME I READ A MIDDLE GRADE BOOK. THE LAST MIDDLE GRADE BOOK THAT I CAN REMEMBER READING WAS CRENSHAW BY KATHERINE APPLEGATE. HOPEFULLY THIS WILL BE GOOD TOO.

13. A List of Cages
by Robin Roe

Synopsis: When Adam Blake lands the best elective ever in his senior year, serving as an aide to the school psychologist, he thinks he’s got it made. Sure, it means a lot of sitting around, which isn’t easy for a guy with ADHD, but he can’t complain, since he gets to spend the period texting all his friends. Then the doctor asks him to track down the troubled freshman who keeps dodging her, and Adam discovers that the boy is Julian—the foster brother he hasn’t seen in five years.

Adam is ecstatic to be reunited. At first, Julian seems like the boy he once knew. He’s still kindhearted. He still writes stories and loves picture books meant for little kids. But as they spend more time together, Adam realizes that Julian is keeping secrets, like where he hides during the middle of the day, and what’s really going on inside his house. Adam is determined to help him, but his involvement could cost both boys their lives…

THIS BOOK HAS AN UNDERWHELMING COVER BUT WHAT PIQUED MY ATTENTION IS THE NUMEROUS PRAISES THAT THIS BOOK HAS BEEN GETTING.

What books from above have you read and enjoyed? What book can you recommend me to read first? Let me know your thoughts. 🙂

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7 thoughts on “Ebook Haul #2: 13 Recent eBooks I Added To My To-Be-Read list

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