My 2017 #AroundTheWorldAThon TBR

And I’m joining another read-a-thon! I did quite well with my first read-a-thon which was #Diverseathon. This time the read-a-thon that I am joining is Around The World-A-Thon! This has the same purpose as Diverseathon, which is to read diversely, though Around The World-A-Thon read-a-thon focuses on a particular geographical location. They give you a specific region or continent and the books that you’ll be reading should be from authors from those places or set in those places. On it’s second year, this read-a-thon aims to promote diversity in reading. You know me, I’m so supportive with these types of read-a-thon. Last year the books read were from authors or set in Oceania and this time it’s East Asia and some countries from South Asia.

I decided that this time, I’ll stick to reading books that I have physical copies of. Well, I consider it as a good way of ticking off some of my physical books from my forever growing TBR pile.

This read-a-thon is hosted by Youtubers Aprilius Maximus and Melbourne on my Mind and it runs from Monday 15th May until Sunday 21st May. The rules are simple:
1. Read a book set within the set countries
2. Read a book by an author from an area within set countries

And the set Countries/Territories are:
East Asia: China, Japan, South Korea, North Korea, Mongolia, Taiwan and Hong Kong.
South Asia: Nepal and Bhutan

So here’s my #AroundTheWorldAThon to-be-read pile featuring the books by East Asian authors. 🙂

1. The Life of a Stupid Man by Ryunosuke Akutagawa (Japan)
Paperback: 55 pages
Publisher: Penguin Classics
SYNOPSIS:

‘What is the life of a human being – a drop of dew, a flash of lightning? This is so sad, so sad.’

Autobiographical stories from one of Japan’s masters of modernist story-telling.

Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 books for Penguin’s 80th birthday. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th-century California and the Russian steppe. Here are stories lyrical and savage; poems epic and intimate; essays satirical and inspirational; and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions.

Ryunosuke Akutagawa (1892-1927)

Akutagawa’s Rashomon and Seventeen Other Stories is also available in Penguin Classics.

I HAVE FOUR OF THESE BLACK PENGUIN CLASSICS. THIS BOOK IS JUST CUTE AND TINY. I’M EXCITED AS TO WHAT IT IS ALL ABOUT.

2. Beijing Doll by Chun Sue (China)
Paperback: 240 pages
Publisher: Riverhead Books
SYNOPSIS:

Banned in China for its candid exploration of a young girl’s sexual awakening yet widely acclaimed as being “the first novel of ‘tough youth’ in China” (Beijing Today), Beijing Doll cuts a daring path through China’s rock-and-roll subculture. This cutting edge novel — drawn from the diaries the author kept throughout her teenage years — takes readers to the streets of Beijing where a disaffected generation spurns tradition for lives of self expression, passion, and rock-and-roll. Chun Sue’s explicit sensuality, unflinching attitude towards sex, and raw, lyrical style break new ground in contemporary Chinese literature.

“Banned in China.” NOW THAT GOT ME INTO PICKING THIS BOOK WHEN I SAW IT IN A SECONDHAND BOOK SHOP.

3. Human Acts by Han Kang (South Korea)
Paperback: 224 pages
Publisher: Portobello Books
SYNOPSIS:

Gwangju, South Korea, 1980. In the wake of a viciously suppressed student uprising, a boy searches for his friend’s corpse, a consciousness searches for its abandoned body, and a brutalised country searches for a voice. In a sequence of interconnected chapters the victims and the bereaved encounter censorship, denial, forgiveness and the echoing agony of the original trauma.

Human Acts is a universal book, utterly modern and profoundly timeless. Already a controversial bestseller and award-winning book in Korea, it confirms Han Kang as a writer of immense importance.

I GOT THIS BOOK FROM THE PUBLISHER AND I’VE BEEN MEANING TO START IT SOON. NOW I BELIEVE, I HAVE THE BEST REASON TO READ IT. 

4. Wind/Pinball by Haruki Murakami (Japan)
Hardbound: 234 pages
Publisher: Knopf
SYNOPSIS:

The debut short novels–nearly thirty years out of print– by the internationally acclaimed writer, newly retranslated and in one English-language volume for the first time, with a new introduction by the author.

These first major works of fiction by Haruki Murakami center on two young men–an unnamed narrator and his friend and former roommate, the Rat. Powerful, at times surreal, stories of loneliness, obsession, and eroticism, these novellas bear all the hallmarks of Murakami’s later books, giving us a fascinating insight into a great writer’s beginnings, and are remarkable works of fiction in their own right. Here too is an exclusive essay by Murakami in which he explores and explains his decision to become a writer. Prequels to the much-beloved classics A Wild Sheep Chase and Dance Dance Dance, these early works are essential reading for Murakami completists and contemporary fiction lovers alike.

A READATHON THAT FEATURES AUTHORS FROM EAST ASIA. OF COURSE I WILL INCLUDE A BOOK BY MY FAVORITE AUTHOR. 🙂

5. The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino (Japan)
Hardbound: 298 pages
Publisher: Minotaur Books
SYNOPSIS:

Yasuko Hanaoka is a divorced, single mother who thought she had finally escaped her abusive ex-husband Togashi. When he shows up one day to extort money from her, threatening both her and her teenaged daughter Misato, the situation quickly escalates into violence and Togashi ends up dead on her apartment floor. Overhearing the commotion, Yasuko’s next door neighbor, middle-aged high school mathematics teacher Ishigami, offers his help, disposing not only of the body but plotting the cover-up step-by-step.

When the body turns up and is identified, Detective Kusanagi draws the case and Yasuko comes under suspicion. Kusanagi is unable to find any obvious holes in Yasuko’s manufactured alibi and yet is still sure that there’s something wrong. Kusanagi brings in Dr. Manabu Yukawa, a physicist and college friend who frequently consults with the police. Yukawa, known to the police by the nickname Professor Galileo, went to college with Ishigami. After meeting up with him again, Yukawa is convinced that Ishigami had something to do with the murder. What ensues is a high level battle of wits, as Ishigami tries to protect Yasuko by outmaneuvering and outthinking Yukawa, who faces his most clever and determined opponent yet.

THIS IS THE BOOK THAT I HAVE IN MY TBR THE LONGEST IN THIS LIST. I’M THRILLED HOW THIS MYSTERY BOOK WILL PLAY OUT.

I encourage everyone to participate in this readathon!

Let me know in the comments down below if you are also participating and what books will you be reading. 🙂

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